Face-to-face psychotherapy for chronic pain in children and adolescents: Cochrane review calls for better primary research

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Lisa Burscheidt summarises a recent Cochrane review of psychotherapy for chronic pain in children and adolescents, which concludes that psychological therapies should be considered as a treatment, but better primary studies are needed to help steer pain management decisions.

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Combining psychotherapy and antidepressants is best for common mental illnesses

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Patrick Kennedy-Williams summarises a recent meta-analysis, which finds that combined treatment with psychotherapy and antidepressants is more effective than treatment with antidepressants alone.

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Interpersonal counselling for depression: RCT shows some promise

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Mark Smith summarises an RCT which compares SSRI antidepressants with interpersonal counselling for depression. The trial explores moderators of remission with interpersonal counselling or drug treatment in primary care patients with mild-moderate depression.

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Psychotherapy for depression in older adults: promising results, but insufficient good quality research

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This recent meta-analysis confirms that psychotherapy has a moderate to high effect on depression in older adults. However, a note of caution is sounded because of publication bias and the low quality of several of the included studies.

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Outcome and methodological comparisons in psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy meta-analyses

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Andrew Shepherd summarises a recent JAMA Psychiatry study looking at the efficacy of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy for adult psychiatric disorders (and uses words like hubristic and existential quite a lot!)

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It’s all in the control group: wait-list control may exaggerate apparent efficacy of CBT for depression

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This blog should set the cat amongst the pigeons! Ioana Cristea reviews a recent network meta-analysis in Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica and discovers that CBT supporters face some well-documented criticism that requires a considered response. Do join in with the discussion and tell us what you think of this new research.

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Psychotherapy trials should report the side effects of treatment

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If a treatment is powerful enough to have a good effect, then it’s powerful enough to have a bad effect. This is well recognised when it comes to medication, with strict regulations in place to ensure adverse outcomes are monitored and measured. By contrast, psychotherapy has never been as readily associated with the potential to [read the full story...]

Psychotherapy for social functioning in depression: insufficient good quality research into an overlooked issue

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Social functioning is defined as the degree to which a person is able to fulfill different roles in social environments, such as home, work or relationships (Bosc, 2000). There is consistent evidence that depressed patients display considerable social functioning impairments, which add significantly to the burden of depression. In a recent article published in Psychological [read the full story...]

Is the Dodo finally dead?

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There’s been a lot of chatter here in the woodlands about the role of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in psychosis – what do service users think of it? Can it be used in place of antipsychotics for some people? Outside of the woodlands, CBT for psychosis has also been generating a lot of attention: Does [read the full story...]

Psychological treatment may be useful in reducing depression and anxiety in people with dementia, says new Cochrane review

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Depression and anxiety are both common conditions in patients with dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), with some studies finding around 30% of patients show at least some depressive symptoms (Enache et al, 2011). Similarly, a study on vascular dementia found around 70% of participants had two or more symptoms of anxiety (Ballard et al, 2000). [read the full story...]