Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy may reduce the demand for primary care visits

shutterstock_on the phone

Can’t get an appointment with your GP? Don’t stress, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy may help by reducing the demand for primary care visits by distressed patients, according to a new study in the Journal of Psychosomatic Research.

[read the full story...]

New meta-analysis supports the use of mindfulness for depression, but not anxiety

shutterstock_144763666

This study confirms that mindfulness based interventions (MBIs) are valid for the treatment of current depressive episodes, and it identifies the need for more studies to investigate the possibility that MBIs might also be of value in treating anxiety disorders.

[read the full story...]

Health effects of depression: keeping economists’ models on track

shutterstock_169007078

Health Economist Christopher Sampson reports on a recent systematic review and meta-analysis, which shows health-related quality of life utility values vary between studies and economic models should consider this.

[read the full story...]

Program of regular exercise may be beneficial in reducing depression in older adults

shutterstock_172646156

The evidence-base supporting the use of exercise for depression is ever growing. Susie Johnson reports on a recent systematic review that adds to the discussion, but it’s not without its own limitations.

[read the full story...]

It’s all in the control group: wait-list control may exaggerate apparent efficacy of CBT for depression

cheating dice

This blog should set the cat amongst the pigeons! Ioana Cristea reviews a recent network meta-analysis in Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica and discovers that CBT supporters face some well-documented criticism that requires a considered response. Do join in with the discussion and tell us what you think of this new research.

[read the full story...]

Preventing workplace depression: are there universal interventions that work?

shutterstock_193172468

Mental health in the workplace is an area that we’ve blogged about a few times before. This blog features a recent review by Tan et al on workplace interventions for depression. Mental disorders are the leading cause of sickness absence (Harvey, 2009 and Henderson, 2011), and depression in particular is predicted to be the leading [read the full story...]

Antidepressants work by changing emotional processing

The road to recovery can be long and people need time and space to

For people who are suffering from a severe depression, antidepressants are a very effective treatment, but how they work is still not fully understood.  The basic biochemistry of how one dose of the drug affects one part of the nervous system is known, e.g. increasing serotonin levels at the synapse by preventing it from being [read the full story...]

Bridging the gap: low intensity collaborative care for patients with recent cardiac events can improve mental health and quality of life

shutterstock_the gap

There are many interfaces in mental health services, such as the one between physical and mental health. Where there are interfaces, there are inevitably gaps for patients to fall through. Consequently opportunities are missed to treat mental health problems in those with physical health problems. There is mounting evidence for the effectiveness of Collaborative Care (CC) [read the full story...]

Is telephone peer support for the prevention of postnatal depression worth the cost?

shutterstock_85094719

. Peer support has been a hot topic in the woodland recently. Although there appears to be a lack of evidence to support the clinical effectiveness of peer support interventions for people with severe mental illness, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, it is an approach that is highly valued by many. It might be [read the full story...]