Antidepressants for depression in pregnancy: new systematic review says the jury’s still out

Nikki Newhouse summarises a recent US health technology assessment of antidepressants for depression in pregnancy and the postpartum period, which concludes that the evidence remains inconclusive about the benefits and harms of antidepressants for depression in pregnancy.

[read the full story...]

Are autism and ADHD associated with antidepressants or maternal depression? The debate continues…

 

Amy Green summarises a retrospective observational study that finds prenatal antidepressant exposure is associated with risk for ADHD, but not autistic spectrum disorders. She considers this complex topic and works out what it all means for pregnant women with depression.

[read the full story...]

Exercise for the prevention and treatment of antenatal depression

shutterstock_59173807

Meg Fluharty summarises a recent systematic review looking at exercise for antenatal depression. The review finds preliminary evidence to suggest that exercise may be effective in reducing depression during pregnancy, but the quality of included trials is low to moderate.

[read the full story...]

Prenatal SSRI exposure and autism risk: a dilemma for mums-to-be with depression

shutterstock_pregnant and tablets

Amy Green summarises a population-based study of young children which looks at prenatal exposure to SSRI antidepressants and the social responsiveness symptoms of autism.

[read the full story...]

Is telephone peer support for the prevention of postnatal depression worth the cost?

shutterstock_85094719

. Peer support has been a hot topic in the woodland recently. Although there appears to be a lack of evidence to support the clinical effectiveness of peer support interventions for people with severe mental illness, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, it is an approach that is highly valued by many. It might be [read the full story...]

The mental health of migrant mothers: focus needed on attitudes to mental health, not language barriers

shutterstock_130689305

The impact of ethnicity on treatment and engagement with mental health services is well documented. John Baker’s recent Mental Elf post highlights the damning evidence behind murmurs of institutional racism within the NHS that just won’t go away: certain ethnic groups consistently experience lower quality care and poor outcomes across a wide range of health [read the full story...]

Children of older fathers have an increased risk of psychiatric and academic problems, says new cohort study

man_with_pregnant_partner

Research suggests that the risk of developing psychiatric problems (such as autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability or schizophrenia) may be linked to increased paternal age at the time of conception. This seems quite plausible given that advancing age in men is associated with increased genetic mutations in sperm. However, studies so far have generally not [read the full story...]

Treating antenatal depression could prevent offspring adult depression

shutterstock_120251488

Depression in late adolescence is a major public health concern, not least because it is strongly predictive of persistent, adult depression, which can have a severe effect on socioemotional functioning, education and employment. Increasingly, depression research is turning its attention to the matter of prevention of depression rather than exclusively focusing on treatment options and [read the full story...]

A statistically significant, but small, increased relative risk of learning disabilities in children born via IVF

shutterstock_130308110

In-vitro fertilisation (IVF) is used to help people who experience difficulties in conceiving (see NICE’s guideline for information eligibility). It involves fertilising an egg with sperm in the laboratory, before reimplanting the fertilised egg into the woman’s womb to develop as normal. In cases of male infertility, the sperm can be injected directly in to [read the full story...]

Is ‘natural’ better? Evidence for the efficacy of complementary therapies for antenatal depression

shutterstock_112802128

Can we encourage patients to continue taking complementary and alternative (CAM) treatments for antenatal depression or should we be firmly discouraging them from doing so? We already know from surveys that 11% of primary care patients with anxiety and depression are taking complementary or alternative therapies, which is around the same proportion of people who [read the full story...]