CBT for insomnia in psychiatric populations: an effective alternative to hypnotics?

shutterstock_sheep asleep

Amy Green appraises a systematic review of CBT for insomnia (CBTi) in people with comorbid mental illness, which concludes that cognitive behaviour therapy could be an effective alternative to hypnotics. However, concerns about the review methodology cast some doubt on the findings.

[read the full story...]

Alcohol misuse and PTSD comorbidity: a significant problem lacking solutions

shutterstock_222051436

Current NICE guidelines state that PTSD should not be dealt with unless alcohol dependence is first treated. Paul Christiansen summarises a systematic review of the comorbidity between PTSD and alcohol misuse and wonders where the guidance leaves patients and professionals.

[read the full story...]

Schizophrenia and osteoporosis: sticks and stones may break my bones…

shutterstock_179004116

Chris Pell summarises a recent meta-analysis of prevalence estimates and moderators of low bone mass in people with schizophrenia. The study finds a significantly increased risk of osteoporosis in people with schizophrenia.

[read the full story...]

Promoting safer sex in people with severe mental illness

HIV 3

Caroline Tomes summarises a recent systematic review which finds that behavioural interventions can result in short-term increases in safer sex in people with severe mental illness.

[read the full story...]

Mental disorders after critical illness: depression, PTSD and functional disability in survivors of intensive care

shutterstock_155305655-150x150

The BRAIN-ICU prospective cohort study published in the Lancet Respiratory Medicine looks at mental health outcomes and functional disabilities in a general ICU population. It explores the hypothesis that depressive symptoms after discharge are more often somatic (i.e. bodily complaints) than cognitive-affective (i.e. thought-related and mood-related complaints).

[read the full story...]

Meta-review presents the risks of all-cause and suicide mortality in mental disorders

shutterstock_177940451

This recent and well-conducted meta-review concludes that the impact on mortality and suicide of mental disorders is substantial, and probably poorly appreciated as a public health problem. Raphael Underwood’s blog summarises the data for all-cause and suicide mortality in mental disorders.

[read the full story...]

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy may reduce the demand for primary care visits

shutterstock_on the phone

Can’t get an appointment with your GP? Don’t stress, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy may help by reducing the demand for primary care visits by distressed patients, according to a new study in the Journal of Psychosomatic Research.

[read the full story...]

We don’t know if general health advice improves physical health for patients with serious mental illness

shutterstock_112862074

For me, one of the most infuriating aspects of health care is the relegation of mental health problems, and mental health services, as secondary to physical health. There are a myriad of examples of this, from the classic stigma that people with mental health problems receive compared to those with physical health problems (fantastically illustrated [read the full story...]

Bridging the gap: low intensity collaborative care for patients with recent cardiac events can improve mental health and quality of life

shutterstock_the gap

There are many interfaces in mental health services, such as the one between physical and mental health. Where there are interfaces, there are inevitably gaps for patients to fall through. Consequently opportunities are missed to treat mental health problems in those with physical health problems. There is mounting evidence for the effectiveness of Collaborative Care (CC) [read the full story...]

Rates of psychosis in epilepsy may not be as high as previously reported, says new systematic review

cogs in outline of head

For many years, psychiatry has highlighted that people with epilepsy appear to have an elevated risk for psychosis.  However, studies exploring this relationship (of which there are many) seem to disagree on just what the prevalence of psychosis is in this group.  For example, Gudmundsson (1966) interviewed every patient with epilepsy in Iceland and concluded [read the full story...]