Bridging the gap: low intensity collaborative care for patients with recent cardiac events can improve mental health and quality of life

shutterstock_the gap

There are many interfaces in mental health services, such as the one between physical and mental health. Where there are interfaces, there are inevitably gaps for patients to fall through. Consequently opportunities are missed to treat mental health problems in those with physical health problems. There is mounting evidence for the effectiveness of Collaborative Care (CC) [read the full story...]

Financial incentives don’t increase depression screening for patients with chronic illness

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The lines between physical health and mental health are blurred in lots of ways, and one example is the fact that people with chronic physical conditions are also more likely to suffer from depression. As well as adding to their burden of illness, there’s also some evidence that those patients with comorbid depression have worse [read the full story...]

Do interventions proven to improve cardiovascular disease outcomes work for individuals with severe mental illness?

shutterstock_high blood pressure

Individuals with severe mental illness (SMI) have shortened life expectancies compared to the general population. This is partly down to higher rates of chronic physical illness. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among patients using mental health services. It is assumed that interventions used to reduce CVD are similarly effective in patients with [read the full story...]

Post-ACS depression treatment more effective when led by patient preference

The role of patient choice was a critical component of this study

Patients who suffer from depression after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may benefit from stepped treatment, which takes patient preference into account, a recent study suggests. Furthermore this course of action does not appear to result in a significant increase in healthcare costs. Crucially post-ACS depression has been associated with both an increased risk of ACS [read the full story...]

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Treatment of depression after a heart attack does not improve the long-term risk of adverse cardiac events but may increase survival

shutterstock_heart and doctor

Although there have been huge advances in the treatment of heart disease, it is still the UK’s biggest killer (more information on heart disease can be found at the British Heart Foundation’s website). Depression after a heart attack is common (roughly 20% prevalence) and can worsen heart disease and increase the risk of death.  A [read the full story...]

Healthy Active Lives (HeAL): tackling premature death in young people with psychosis

Teenage girl holding up her hand

The Healthy Active Lives (HeAL) international consensus statement aims to reverse the trend of people with severe mental illness dying early by tackling risks for future physical illnesses pro-actively and much earlier. The statement is being launched today by the Royal College of Psychiatrists, at a special event focusing on achieving parity between mental and [read the full story...]

Limited evidence suggests that co-morbid chronic physical illness may not increase risk for recurrence in depression

Depression

There is a widespread clinical presumption that people who have both major depressive disorder (MDD) and a co-morbid chronic physical illness represent a ‘double trouble’ group. This leads to the expectation that the depression prognosis for these people would be poor with increasing likelihood of recurrence. Evidence supports the view that depression is prevalent among [read the full story...]

Depression increases risk of all cause mortality (not just heart disease) in diabetes

Depression is associated with mortality of all causes

This blog is coming across the woodland in stereo as the Diabetes and Mental Elf join forces. In 2011 the Diabetes Elf highlighted Depression and Diabetes: a two way street? a systematic review looking at cause and effect of diabetes and depression and the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease is not contested. However moving forward [read the full story...]

The cardiovascular safety of dementia medications: a cross national study

Dice with broken heart

Two of the most widely available medicines for dementia in the UK are cholinesterase inhibitors and a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists (NHS, 2013).  Both drugs are popular because they have been found to lead to improvements in dementia symptoms (Raina 2008). However, some have raised concerns about the safety for patients. These concerns are partly [read the full story...]

Valuing mental health as much as physical health: new report from the Royal College of Psychiatrists

Parity

The Royal College of Psychiatrists has today published what they are calling a landmark report on achieving parity between mental and physical health. The report, Whole-Person Care: From Rhetoric to Reality, defines parity as valuing mental health equally with physical health. It highlights the significant inequalities that exist between physical and mental health care, including [read the full story...]